Ethical Acu-Bragging: Evidence, talking points and reading lists for upright conversations with patients and providers | Healthy Seminars

Ethical Acu-Bragging: Evidence, talking points and reading lists for upright conversations with patients and providers

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Ethical Acu-Bragging: Evidence, talking points and reading lists for upright conversations with patients and providers

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By and large, being a climate scientist in today’s world means asking questions about how the climate is changing and what we can do about it – not seriously questioning whether it is happening at all. Similarly for acupuncture, a useful conversation can be had about the strength of evidence for this or that particular complaint -- but most people who question 'whether it works' are unaware of the extensive mechanisms literature on its multiple, clearly demonstrated local and systemic impacts in animal and human models.

As acupuncturists who routinely see it 'work', we may find it challenging to communicate straightforwardly and non-defensively with patients and family members who are confused and concerned about their health. We are ethically obligated to provide accurate and truthful information, both in our advertising and in the informed consent process – and we don’t get to make the rules about what constitutes accuracy. While some patients are interested in learning more about their Qi, many patients (and busy health care providers) ‘just want to see the evidence’. Unfortunately though, recent clinical trials and systematic reviews represent only a narrow subset of what acupuncture is used for clinically, and worldwide. If we focus on these to the exclusion of all other types of evidence, we risk disrespecting and impoverishing our own rich medical tradition. Conversely if we manage these conversations well, we open avenues of insight and communication that can benefit both the field and our own practices.

    Goals & Objectives
  • Understand key principles of ‘scientific communication’, including the powerful emotions that can arise in scientific thinkers who see them violated in advertising or personal communications.
  • Be able to select from and articulate at least five distinct lines of basic research demonstrating mechanical, endocrine, and immunomodulatory effects of acupuncture on ‘hard endpoints’ not subject to arguments regarding the placebo effect.
  • Draw on a provided resource list to give journal articles and evidence summaries to those who seek accurate and truthful information regarding efficacy.
  • NCCAOM AOM-ET: 
    2.00
    Texas Ethics: 
    2.00
    Florida Prevention of Medical Errors: 
    2.00
    California Category : 
    Category 1

    Claudia Citkovitz, PhD, MS, LAc., has trained some 270 acupuncture students and practitioners in the care of inpatients at NYU Langone Hospital - Brooklyn. Her study of acupuncture during birth (2009) was the first in the US, as was her 2015 PhD study on acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation (2015). Her book, ‘Acupressure and Acupuncture during Birth’ was published in 2019. Claudia is an active practitioner, educator and peer reviewer, serving on the board of the Society for Acupuncture Research (SAR) and the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine (ACAHM) and as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Integrative and Complementary Medicine (JICM).



    $57.00 USD